Living between realms: Embodying

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embodying

Second in series of three articles ‘Neurosis is always a substitute for legitimate suffering.’ – Carl G. Jung, from Psychology and Religion: West and East   In the first article, we saw that what Carl Jung viewed as the path of becoming an authentic individual, involves much more than changing our philosophies, beliefs or correcting our ‘errors of thought’. Deep and lasting transformation of our being involves processes that shape us at the core. Such change has to be imprinted on a body level; it has to be embodied to be lasting. We saw that for this to occur, requires that we ‘stay close to […]

Shambhala – the Sacred Path of the Warrior

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shambhala

Like much of Chogyam Trungpa’s writing, this little book is somewhat deceptive. The language is so simple. But soon the attentive reader realises that she is being spun into a many-layered world of vast depths. Shambhala – the Sacred Path of the Warrior is one of two Trungpa books released by Shambhala meant to contain ‘secular’ teachings. Of course, the Lama remains rooted in his Buddhist lineage. But this little volume, being part of Trungpa’s Shambhala vision, was delivered in the spirit of providing everyday teachings to westerners, unadorned by the ‘other-worldliness’ of traditional Buddhist teachings. As the name suggests, these teachings tap authentically and […]

The golden mean

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The golden mean

‘Rectitude is a matter of making the innate tendencies of things conform to their natures.’ – From The Classic of Changes, A New Translation of the I Ching as Interpreted by Wang Bi, by Richard John Lynn Buddhism outlines a path through which we may loosen the grip of suffering on us, called the eightfold path. The first of these eight practices entails a shift in perspective and is called ‘right view’. It is also the foundation for the other seven. Without right view there can be no right intention, right speech, right action, right effort, right livelihood, right mindfulness and right absorption. It entails […]

Fear – our first teacher

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Opening to fear

‘The importance of fear has been given too little true psychological attention. … The biblical statement that fear is the beginning of wisdom is significant. … Fear is not merely something wrong, to be overcome with courage … but is rather something right, a form of wise counsel. … Love stirs fear. At the deepest level of fear eros appears. … Fear seems an inherent necessity to the eros experience; where it is absent, one might well doubt the full validity of the loving.’ – James Hillman, from The Myth of Analysis Opening to fear Fear is a most common emotion. Yet, few of us […]

The discipline of openness

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The discipline of the path

‘It takes tremendous effort to work one’s way through the difficulties of the path and actually get into the situations of life thoroughly and properly.’ – Chogyam Trungpa, from Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism Openness When we hear the word ‘discipline’ we usually understand it to mean forcing ourselves into doing things against our will and our instinct. We feel we have to hold our breath lest we slip up or make a mistake, until we get to that goal the discipline is supposed to help us achieve. But in fact, this kind of discipline is only an obstruction to cultivating soul and being on the […]

The path

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The path

‘Footfalls echo in the memory Down the passage which we did not take Towards the door we never opened Into the rose-garden. My words echo Thus, in your mind.                                                 But to what purpose Disturbing the dust on the bowl of rose-leaves I do not know.                                                 Other echoes Inhabit the garden. Shall we follow?’ – T.S. Eliot from […]